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“Mozilla’s ‘top 5’ good things in Europe’s upcoming GDPR regulation”

Denelle Dixon-Thayer, is chief legal and business officer at Mozilla, the global, not-for-profit that creates open-source products like Firefox and campaigns for a better web

In 24 months from now, a new piece of legislation will apply throughout Europe: the General Data Protection Regulation.

Broadly speaking, we see the GDPR as advantageous for both users and companies, with trust and security being key components of a successful business in today’s digital age.

We’re glad to see an update for European data protection law – the GDPR is replacing the earlier data protection ‘directive’,  95/46/EC, which was drafted more than 20 years ago when only 1 per cent of Europeans had access to the internet.

With the GDPR’s formal adoption as of 14 April 2016, the countdown to compliance has begun. Businesses operating in all 28 European Union (EU) member states have until 25 May 2018 to get ready for compliance, or face fines of up to 4 per cent of their worldwide turnover.

The GDPR aims to modernise data protection rules for today’s digital challenges, increase harmonisation within the EU, strengthen enforcement powers and increase user control over personal data.

The Regulation moved these goals forward, although it’s not without its flaws.

With some elements of it, the devil will be in the details and it remains to be seen what the impact will be in practice.

That aside, there are many good pieces of the Regulation that stand out. We want to call out five:

1. Less is more: we welcome the reaffirmation of core privacy principles requiring that businesses should limit the amount of data they collect and justify for what purpose they collect data. At Mozilla, we advocate for businesses to adopt lean data practices.

2. Greater transparency equals smarter individual choice: we applaud the Regulation’s endorsement of transparency and user education.

3. Privacy as the default setting: businesses managing data will have to consider privacy throughout the entire lifecycle of products and services. That means that from the day teams start designing a product, privacy must be top of mind. It also means that strong privacy should always be the “by-default setting”.

4. Privacy and competition are mutually reinforcing: with added controls for users like the ability to port their personal data, users remain the owners of their data, even when they leave a service. Because this increases the ability to move to another provider, this creates competition and prevents user lock-in within one online platform.

5. What’s good for the user is good for business: strengthened data and security practices also decreases the risks associated with personal data collection and processing, for both users and businesses. This is not negligible –  in 2015 data breaches have cost on average $3.79m per impacted company, without mentioning the customer trust they lost.

Above and beyond the direct impact of the GDPR, its standard-setting potential is substantial.

It is more than a purely regional regulation, as it will have global impact. Any business that markets goods or services to users in the EU will be subject to compliance, regardless of whether their business is located in the EU.

We will continue to track the implications of the GDPR over the next 24 months as it comes into force and will stay engaged with any opportunities to work out the final details.

We encourage European internet users and businesses everywhere to join us.